Bitbucket now rocks Git

By on October 3, 2011

You’ve been asking for it, we’ve even joked about it – now it’s here (for real): for the one year anniversary of Bitbucket joining Atlassian, we are happy to announce Git support.

All your source, all in one-place

Whether you are using Hg or Git, you can now keep all of your code in one place with your preferred DVCS format. If you have existing code you would like to migrate, you can easily import your Git, Mercurial or Subversion source code. We have added a new importer for GitHub to our existing site importers which include SourceForge, Google Code and Codeplex.

Unlimited private and public repositories

A big advantage for Bitbucket users is the ability to have unlimited private repositories for free. This means you can store every line of code you’ve ever written in one place without paying a cent.

Notable Changes

UI improvements have been happening gradually over the past six months:

Today’s release includes a new UI for the repository and user administration pages. A never ending goal is to make Bitbucket easier to navigate and use the operations you need fast.

Get your Git on

Pull requests, code commenting and key integrations with developer tools (JIRA, Pivotal, Lighthouse, Flowdock, HipChat, Twitter, Bamboo, Jenkins, Cloud9IDE and more) have made this a feature filled year. And now we add Git…

If you haven’t checked us out lately, Bitbucket has had a year of record growth – more than tripling the number of accounts since the acquisition, adding over 350 improvements, bug fixes and new features.

149 Comments

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:17 pm | Permalink

    YOU ARE KILLING MERCURIAL :’-(nnp.s.: just kidding

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:17 pm | Permalink

    YOU ARE KILLING MERCURIAL :’-(

    p.s.: just kidding

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:17 pm | Permalink

    YOU ARE KILLING MERCURIAL :’-(

    p.s.: just kidding

    • James McKay
      Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:46 pm | Permalink

      I don’t think that’s the case actually. I’ve noticed the two seem to attract different demographics. Git users tend to gravitate towards lower level stuff whereas Mercurial users tend to focus more on end user applications.

      • Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:50 pm | Permalink

        Well, my opinion is: it’s very cool to have git support, unless it took time of the same developers to do things like adding “.. code-block” support to README (and maybe other small but important things).

        • Posted October 3, 2011 at 11:19 pm | Permalink

          Hi James. Which markup syntax is missing code block support? I’d like to know so that we can (hopefully) rectify the situation.

          • Posted October 4, 2011 at 5:07 am | Permalink

            reStructuredText to support Pygments for .. code-block:: python, for example. I guess I’ve already created a ticket for that 🙂

          • Posted October 4, 2011 at 5:04 pm | Permalink

            You have indeed: https://bitbucket.org/site/master/issue/2698.

            Now that we’ve launched Git support we should have more time to spend working through our backlog.

      • Jon Langevin
        Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:31 pm | Permalink

        The trend I’ve seen is more git[hub] users seem to come from Linux/Mac, whereas hg/Bitbucket seems to have more Windows users (with a mix of Linux/Mac).

        Github itself seems to have really propagated git, primarily due to it’s social coding aspect (which Bitbucket seems to be trailing behind on)

    • Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:52 pm | Permalink

      No way!

      ~200,000 users on Bitbucket depend on Mercurial for day-to-day development. 
      Bitbucket and Atlassian have a lot invested in Mercurial. This is why we have previously and continue to donate to the Mercurial Fellowship Project that manages the Mercurial open-source development.

      Contributions allow Matt Mackall, the primary Mercurial author and project leader, to work full-time on new feature development with assistance from the community, coordinate and support other contributors, improve documentation, fix bugs, and organize coding sprints.

    • Posted October 4, 2011 at 1:24 am | Permalink

      Good riddance! =)

  • Anon
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:47 pm | Permalink

    Very cool indeed, keep up the good work!

  • Anon
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:47 pm | Permalink

    Very cool indeed, keep up the good work!

  • Anon
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:47 pm | Permalink

    Very cool indeed, keep up the good work!

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:58 pm | Permalink

    If you guys could get submodules included in the downloads, you would have a feature that GitHub does not have. u00a0They seem to refuse to get it working. u00a0It is a limitation of the git archive command. u00a0However, their are other ways of getting it done. u00a0I would probably switch to BitBucket for all of my repos if this was supported.

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:58 pm | Permalink

    If you guys could get submodules included in the downloads, you would have a feature that GitHub does not have.  They seem to refuse to get it working.  It is a limitation of the git archive command.  However, their are other ways of getting it done.  I would probably switch to BitBucket for all of my repos if this was supported.

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 4:58 pm | Permalink

    If you guys could get submodules included in the downloads, you would have a feature that GitHub does not have.  They seem to refuse to get it working.  It is a limitation of the git archive command.  However, their are other ways of getting it done.  I would probably switch to BitBucket for all of my repos if this was supported.

  • pragnesh
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:04 pm | Permalink

    great to see git support bitbucket is rockingn

  • pragnesh
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:04 pm | Permalink

    great to see git support bitbucket is rockingn

  • pragnesh
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:04 pm | Permalink

    great to see git support bitbucket is rocking

    • Posted October 4, 2011 at 5:05 pm | Permalink

      😀

    • Jon Langevin
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:26 pm | Permalink

      agreed, Github has a couple of nice features (and a huge user base it seems), but I completely prefer Bitbucket (aside from the couple of remaining features that BB is missing). I’ve already got all of my repos on BB though, as I’d rather deal with any limitations than have to use Github as well 🙂

    • Mack
      Posted December 22, 2011 at 8:59 pm | Permalink

      I’m using bitbucket now myself. I still have a github account but I much prefer bitbucket

  • pragnesh
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:04 pm | Permalink

    great to see git support bitbucket is rocking

  • Jonathan Hall
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:06 pm | Permalink

    *awesome*nI can now store all my git/hg projects easily in one place.

  • Jonathan Hall
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:06 pm | Permalink

    *awesome*nI can now store all my git/hg projects easily in one place.

  • Anonymous
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:06 pm | Permalink

    *awesome*
    I can now store all my git/hg projects easily in one place.

    • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:38 pm | Permalink

      When you create a new repository, you pick the DVCS flavor you’d like to use — Git or Mercurial.

    • Jon Langevin
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:47 pm | Permalink

      In addition to what Justen said, you also cannot convert post-creation (so if you choose git or hg, you’re stuck with that choice currently).

  • Anonymous
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:06 pm | Permalink

    *awesome*
    I can now store all my git/hg projects easily in one place.

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:12 pm | Permalink

    will mercurial stay first-class citizen at bitbucket?

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:12 pm | Permalink

    will mercurial stay first-class citizen at bitbucket?

    • Martin Geisler
      Posted October 3, 2011 at 9:25 pm | Permalink

      Is the free page hosting anything like how Bitbucket publishes your repository at “.bitbucket.org” if the repository is named “.bitbucket.org”? Like this: http://mg.bitbucket.org/

      • Posted October 4, 2011 at 5:36 am | Permalink

        well, can’t blame you for trying to get some revenue from hype around git 🙂

        • Jon Langevin
          Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:44 pm | Permalink

          The question is, how popular, heavily used, and profitable was Confluence for Mac?
          The Bitbucket business model obviously work, as pretty much anyone in the world can be a client, whereas targeting Mac specifically is quite a niche, then narrowing that to anyone that might want to use Confluence, then narrow that further to Confluence on a Mac… That’s what, 2 customers?

          Atlassian killing Bitbucket would be like… Github killing Github…  If anything, it would just be sold off.

          If you’re worried, just back all your repos up. For instance, I store all of my checkouts within my Dropbox folder, so I have free backup and replication to all of my workstations.

          Cheers

        • Posted October 4, 2011 at 9:43 pm | Permalink

          Hi Lars – as per our conversation on Twitter we did publish an End of Support Announcement for Mac as an OS three months prior to the release of Confluence 4.0. See here: http://atlss.in/oPlXNj

          You can still run Confluence on Mac OS X – I actually run my demo environment on my MacBook Pro. We just do not provide support for production instances on Mac OS X.

      • Jon Langevin
        Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:32 pm | Permalink

        just don’t add Subversion, let it die out 🙂

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:12 pm | Permalink

    will mercurial stay first-class citizen at bitbucket?

    • Posted October 3, 2011 at 11:21 pm | Permalink

      Absolutely. Bitbucket itself is hosted on Bitbucket, and we’ve been using Mercurial all along. We’re thrilled to be able to provide users with *two* great version control systems, and we’re committed to supporting both.

      • Posted October 4, 2011 at 5:36 am | Permalink

        well, can’t blame you for trying to get some revenue from hype around git 🙂

      • Jon Langevin
        Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:32 pm | Permalink

        just don’t add Subversion, let it die out 🙂

  • Antanas Konu010dius
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:20 pm | Permalink

    wow, that’s superawesome! one more reason to become paid user 🙂

  • Antanas Konu010dius
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:20 pm | Permalink

    wow, that’s superawesome! one more reason to become paid user 🙂

  • Antanas Končius
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:20 pm | Permalink

    wow, that’s superawesome! one more reason to become paid user 🙂

  • Antanas Končius
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:20 pm | Permalink

    wow, that’s superawesome! one more reason to become paid user 🙂

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:26 pm | Permalink

    Congrats to the [B|G]itBucket u00a0team!

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:26 pm | Permalink

    Congrats to the [B|G]itBucket  team!

    • Jon Langevin
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:46 pm | Permalink

      Issue tracking is a bit better, but it seems to me that a product such as TeamworkPM is best when it comes to managing tasks. I just wish I had integration between TeamworkPM and Bitbucket…

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:26 pm | Permalink

    Congrats to the [B|G]itBucket  team!

  • Rob
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:27 pm | Permalink

    If you guys remain committed to stealing all of GitHub’s features and UI, I will definitely move my repos over.

  • Rob
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:27 pm | Permalink

    If you guys remain committed to stealing all of GitHub’s features and UI, I will definitely move my repos over.

  • Rob
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:27 pm | Permalink

    If you guys remain committed to stealing all of GitHub’s features and UI, I will definitely move my repos over.

    • Posted October 4, 2011 at 5:05 pm | Permalink

      😀

    • Jon Langevin
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:26 pm | Permalink

      agreed, Github has a couple of nice features (and a huge user base it seems), but I completely prefer Bitbucket (aside from the couple of remaining features that BB is missing). I’ve already got all of my repos on BB though, as I’d rather deal with any limitations than have to use Github as well 🙂

    • Mack
      Posted December 22, 2011 at 8:59 pm | Permalink

      I’m using bitbucket now myself. I still have a github account but I much prefer bitbucket

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:28 pm | Permalink

    Hello– so I’m confused– is the idea that it is now possible to download bitbucket repositories using git? Or is it just that when you create a new repository you have a choice as to whether to use git or mercurial, and the repository is then locked to that format? Thanks.

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:28 pm | Permalink

    Hello– so I’m confused– is the idea that it is now possible to download bitbucket repositories using git? Or is it just that when you create a new repository you have a choice as to whether to use git or mercurial, and the repository is then locked to that format? Thanks.

    • Posted October 3, 2011 at 7:04 pm | Permalink

      Bitbucket revenue comes from the small teams that need to add collaborators to their repositories.

      We also have an on-demand version of JIRA that folks are finding useful, who need more granular control of their issue tracker and integration with other business tools

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:28 pm | Permalink

    Hello– so I’m confused– is the idea that it is now possible to download bitbucket repositories using git? Or is it just that when you create a new repository you have a choice as to whether to use git or mercurial, and the repository is then locked to that format? Thanks.

    • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:38 pm | Permalink

      When you create a new repository, you pick the DVCS flavor you’d like to use — Git or Mercurial.

    • Jon Langevin
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:47 pm | Permalink

      In addition to what Justen said, you also cannot convert post-creation (so if you choose git or hg, you’re stuck with that choice currently).

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:33 pm | Permalink

    Awesome! I’d much prefer to use bitbucket, but some of the other features of github are very nice… Hopefully bitbucket will get organizations and free page hosting also (github pages or w/e). u00a0But I will definitely start pulling my repositories from github and putting them on bitbucket with the git integration, that’s awesome!

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:33 pm | Permalink

    Awesome! I’d much prefer to use bitbucket, but some of the other features of github are very nice… Hopefully bitbucket will get organizations and free page hosting also (github pages or w/e).  But I will definitely start pulling my repositories from github and putting them on bitbucket with the git integration, that’s awesome!

    • Anonymous
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 3:48 am | Permalink

      freemium ftw, eh? 🙂

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 5:33 pm | Permalink

    Awesome! I’d much prefer to use bitbucket, but some of the other features of github are very nice… Hopefully bitbucket will get organizations and free page hosting also (github pages or w/e).  But I will definitely start pulling my repositories from github and putting them on bitbucket with the git integration, that’s awesome!

    • Martin Geisler
      Posted October 3, 2011 at 9:25 pm | Permalink

      Is the free page hosting anything like how Bitbucket publishes your repository at “.bitbucket.org” if the repository is named “.bitbucket.org”? Like this: http://mg.bitbucket.org/

      • Martin Geisler
        Posted October 3, 2011 at 9:27 pm | Permalink

        Ah, what a “helpful” idea to auto-close my tags… why not just escape the < and be done with it?

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 6:00 pm | Permalink

    Right, seeing as your Issues tracking is much better than the GitHub rubbish, I will be moving all my repo’s over. Nice job!

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 6:00 pm | Permalink

    Right, seeing as your Issues tracking is much better than the GitHub rubbish, I will be moving all my repo’s over. Nice job!

    • Posted October 3, 2011 at 11:26 pm | Permalink

      Sounds like a useful feature, Carlos. As you can imagine we’ve been working solidly on this release for several months, but we’re now able to take a breath and decide how to go about further improving Bitbucket. The team will gather later in the week to discuss new features. 🙂

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 6:00 pm | Permalink

    Right, seeing as your Issues tracking is much better than the GitHub rubbish, I will be moving all my repo’s over. Nice job!

    • Jon Langevin
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:46 pm | Permalink

      Issue tracking is a bit better, but it seems to me that a product such as TeamworkPM is best when it comes to managing tasks. I just wish I had integration between TeamworkPM and Bitbucket…

  • Benjamin Eidelman
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 6:15 pm | Permalink

    Great! It’s time to make github guys feel some pressure 😉

  • Benjamin Eidelman
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 6:15 pm | Permalink

    Great! It’s time to make github guys feel some pressure 😉

    • Martin Geisler
      Posted October 3, 2011 at 9:27 pm | Permalink

      Ah, what a “helpful” idea to auto-close my tags… why not just escape the < and be done with it?

      • Jon Langevin
        Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:45 pm | Permalink

        Issue *and* wiki import (if not done already) would definitely be a must-have. But of course, the same goes for import from any competitor service (such as Google Code).

  • Benjamin Eidelman
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 6:15 pm | Permalink

    Great! It’s time to make github guys feel some pressure 😉

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 6:58 pm | Permalink

    This sounds too good to be true. What is the catch here? What do you guys gain from hosting my private repositories for free? Do I get targeted ads? Data mining?u00a0nnHow do you guys make money? From donations, adds??

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 6:58 pm | Permalink

    This sounds too good to be true. What is the catch here? What do you guys gain from hosting my private repositories for free? Do I get targeted ads? Data mining? 

    How do you guys make money? From donations, adds??

  • Posted October 3, 2011 at 6:58 pm | Permalink

    This sounds too good to be true. What is the catch here? What do you guys gain from hosting my private repositories for free? Do I get targeted ads? Data mining? 

    How do you guys make money? From donations, adds??

    • Posted October 3, 2011 at 7:04 pm | Permalink

      Bitbucket revenue comes from the small teams that need to add collaborators to their repositories.

      We also have an on-demand version of JIRA that folks are finding useful, who need more granular control of their issue tracker and integration with other business tools

      • Anonymous
        Posted October 4, 2011 at 3:48 am | Permalink

        freemium ftw, eh? 🙂

  • Carlos Zu00fau00f1iga
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 8:23 pm | Permalink

    Will you add a way to import Issues from github?

  • Carlos Zúñiga
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 8:23 pm | Permalink

    Will you add a way to import Issues from github?

    • Posted October 4, 2011 at 5:07 am | Permalink

      reStructuredText to support Pygments for .. code-block:: python, for example. I guess I’ve already created a ticket for that 🙂

  • Carlos Zúñiga
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 8:23 pm | Permalink

    Will you add a way to import Issues from github?

    • Posted October 3, 2011 at 11:26 pm | Permalink

      Sounds like a useful feature, Carlos. As you can imagine we’ve been working solidly on this release for several months, but we’re now able to take a breath and decide how to go about further improving Bitbucket. The team will gather later in the week to discuss new features. 🙂

      • Jon Langevin
        Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:45 pm | Permalink

        Issue *and* wiki import (if not done already) would definitely be a must-have. But of course, the same goes for import from any competitor service (such as Google Code).

        • Posted October 5, 2011 at 6:41 am | Permalink

          These are definitely on my list. We’ll see how things shake out tomorrow.

  • Carl
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 9:29 pm | Permalink

    HOLY **** YES! I LOVE YOU

  • Carl
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 9:29 pm | Permalink

    HOLY **** YES! I LOVE YOU

  • Carl
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 9:29 pm | Permalink

    HOLY **** YES! I LOVE YOU

  • Carl
    Posted October 3, 2011 at 9:29 pm | Permalink

    HOLY **** YES! I LOVE YOU

  • Charlie
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 12:51 am | Permalink

    Bitbucket is now TRUELY the BEST!!! u00a0I can’t wait for cool new features from Bitbucket!

  • Charlie
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 12:51 am | Permalink

    Bitbucket is now TRUELY the BEST!!! u00a0I can’t wait for cool new features from Bitbucket!

  • Charlie
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 12:51 am | Permalink

    Bitbucket is now TRUELY the BEST!!!  I can’t wait for cool new features from Bitbucket!

    • Posted October 4, 2011 at 5:04 pm | Permalink

      You have indeed: https://bitbucket.org/site/master/issue/2698.

      Now that we’ve launched Git support we should have more time to spend working through our backlog.

  • Charlie
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 12:51 am | Permalink

    Bitbucket is now TRUELY the BEST!!!  I can’t wait for cool new features from Bitbucket!

  • Marius
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 5:55 am | Permalink

    Git? What’s next, VSS? ;-)n

  • Marius
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 5:55 am | Permalink

    Git? What’s next, VSS? 😉

    • Scott Farquhar, CEO Atlassian
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 1:23 pm | Permalink

      Fabrice,

      We don’t treat the users as the product.  We’re not an advertising company.

      We make money on the upsell – when your teams get larger, they pay.  Very simple business model.

      Scott

  • Marius
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 5:55 am | Permalink

    Git? What’s next, VSS? 😉

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 6:34 am | Permalink

    Please support Bazaar too!

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 6:34 am | Permalink

    Please support Bazaar too!

    • Posted October 4, 2011 at 9:05 am | Permalink

      You can use hg-git.

    • Erik van Zijst
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 9:29 am | Permalink

      We don’t support conversion of git to hg, or the other way around.

      As Andrew points out, you could use tools such as hg-git to interact with your git repo using hg, but doing an actual, reliable 1-to-1 migration back and forth is tricky.

      We did experiment with it when we started the git project, but couldn’t get it to work/perform well enough, so for now a repo is either git, or hg.

      • Posted October 4, 2011 at 3:57 pm | Permalink

        So that’s why it’s hard to figure out… 🙂
        My comment was without resentment nor intended to give offense. As I said, I appreciate your products and used some for years, and well, I think I’ll give BitBucket some love too.

        Keep going Atlassian !

      • Jon Langevin
        Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:40 pm | Permalink

        That’s the same as the Google business model for Google Apps, except they also monetize via targeting, data mining, ads, across both free and paid versions.

        I like the Atlassian version better :-X

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 6:34 am | Permalink

    Please support Bazaar too!

  • Lars Fischer
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 7:09 am | Permalink

    I’ll stay with Github, you’ll never know when Atlassian kills support for a product (like Confluence for Mac).

  • Lars Fischer
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 7:09 am | Permalink

    I’ll stay with Github, you’ll never know when Atlassian kills support for a product (like Confluence for Mac).

  • Lars Fischer
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 7:09 am | Permalink

    I’ll stay with Github, you’ll never know when Atlassian kills support for a product (like Confluence for Mac).

    • Jon Langevin
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:44 pm | Permalink

      The question is, how popular, heavily used, and profitable was Confluence for Mac?
      The Bitbucket business model obviously work, as pretty much anyone in the world can be a client, whereas targeting Mac specifically is quite a niche, then narrowing that to anyone that might want to use Confluence, then narrow that further to Confluence on a Mac… That’s what, 2 customers?

      Atlassian killing Bitbucket would be like… Github killing Github…  If anything, it would just be sold off.

      If you’re worried, just back all your repos up. For instance, I store all of my checkouts within my Dropbox folder, so I have free backup and replication to all of my workstations.

      Cheers

    • Posted October 4, 2011 at 9:43 pm | Permalink

      Hi Lars – as per our conversation on Twitter we did publish an End of Support Announcement for Mac as an OS three months prior to the release of Confluence 4.0. See here: http://atlss.in/oPlXNj

      You can still run Confluence on Mac OS X – I actually run my demo environment on my MacBook Pro. We just do not provide support for production instances on Mac OS X.

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 7:25 am | Permalink

    It is said when you’re not paying you’re not the customer, you’re the product.nnI mean, this is great, I’ve been a strong supporter – and paying customer – of some of your products, installed and maintained a few Confluence instances for IT customers, and I used JIRA several years. But still, how are we the product here? Quite obvious when it comes to Google or Facebook, but Atlassian, harder to figure out.nnWhatever, thanks for constantly improving your products, which are really great btw. Git support is very welcome (not that I do not like Mercurial, it’s just that Git comes bundled and well supported with my tools).

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 7:25 am | Permalink

    It is said when you’re not paying you’re not the customer, you’re the product.

    I mean, this is great, I’ve been a strong supporter – and paying customer – of some of your products, installed and maintained a few Confluence instances for IT customers, and I used JIRA several years. But still, how are we the product here? Quite obvious when it comes to Google or Facebook, but Atlassian, harder to figure out.

    Whatever, thanks for constantly improving your products, which are really great btw. Git support is very welcome (not that I do not like Mercurial, it’s just that Git comes bundled and well supported with my tools).

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 7:25 am | Permalink

    It is said when you’re not paying you’re not the customer, you’re the product.

    I mean, this is great, I’ve been a strong supporter – and paying customer – of some of your products, installed and maintained a few Confluence instances for IT customers, and I used JIRA several years. But still, how are we the product here? Quite obvious when it comes to Google or Facebook, but Atlassian, harder to figure out.

    Whatever, thanks for constantly improving your products, which are really great btw. Git support is very welcome (not that I do not like Mercurial, it’s just that Git comes bundled and well supported with my tools).

    • Scott Farquhar, CEO Atlassian
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 1:23 pm | Permalink

      Fabrice,

      We don’t treat the users as the product.  We’re not an advertising company.

      We make money on the upsell – when your teams get larger, they pay.  Very simple business model.

      Scott

      • Posted October 4, 2011 at 3:57 pm | Permalink

        So that’s why it’s hard to figure out… 🙂
        My comment was without resentment nor intended to give offense. As I said, I appreciate your products and used some for years, and well, I think I’ll give BitBucket some love too.

        Keep going Atlassian !

      • Jon Langevin
        Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:40 pm | Permalink

        That’s the same as the Google business model for Google Apps, except they also monetize via targeting, data mining, ads, across both free and paid versions.

        I like the Atlassian version better :-X

      • Anonymous
        Posted September 18, 2012 at 4:37 am | Permalink

        Waiting for the day we get large enough to pay!

  • u0141ukasz Gruner
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:20 am | Permalink

    Ok, I imported my github repo (and deleted github account). Where do I click to convert my imported repo to mercurial – so i can be git-free?nBtw, is there an option of automatically creating git mirror for my hg repos?

  • Łukasz Gruner
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:20 am | Permalink

    Ok, I imported my github repo (and deleted github account). Where do I click to convert my imported repo to mercurial – so i can be git-free?
    Btw, is there an option of automatically creating git mirror for my hg repos?

    • Jon Langevin
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:36 pm | Permalink

      You should at least offer conversion during initial import. Speaking of which, when importing a Subversion repository, it still converts to Hg by default, without giving the option for Git. May want to correct that to avoid upsetting your potential Git converts.

      So to summarize, the ability to import from SVN, Hg, Git, and store the resulting repo on Bitbucket as Hg or Git (with the option to choose one or the other), would be stunning.

      Oh, and while I’m dreaming, give us a way to interface with Hg using an optional Git interface, and vice versa (so that we don’t have to deal with modules for that purpose). That would be something that no other host provides to my knowledge. That idea is free of charge even 😉

      • Posted October 5, 2011 at 6:41 am | Permalink

        These are definitely on my list. We’ll see how things shake out tomorrow.

  • Łukasz Gruner
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:20 am | Permalink

    Ok, I imported my github repo (and deleted github account). Where do I click to convert my imported repo to mercurial – so i can be git-free?
    Btw, is there an option of automatically creating git mirror for my hg repos?

    • Posted October 4, 2011 at 9:05 am | Permalink

      You can use hg-git.

    • Erik van Zijst
      Posted October 4, 2011 at 9:29 am | Permalink

      We don’t support conversion of git to hg, or the other way around.

      As Andrew points out, you could use tools such as hg-git to interact with your git repo using hg, but doing an actual, reliable 1-to-1 migration back and forth is tricky.

      We did experiment with it when we started the git project, but couldn’t get it to work/perform well enough, so for now a repo is either git, or hg.

      • Jon Langevin
        Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:36 pm | Permalink

        You should at least offer conversion during initial import. Speaking of which, when importing a Subversion repository, it still converts to Hg by default, without giving the option for Git. May want to correct that to avoid upsetting your potential Git converts.

        So to summarize, the ability to import from SVN, Hg, Git, and store the resulting repo on Bitbucket as Hg or Git (with the option to choose one or the other), would be stunning.

        Oh, and while I’m dreaming, give us a way to interface with Hg using an optional Git interface, and vice versa (so that we don’t have to deal with modules for that purpose). That would be something that no other host provides to my knowledge. That idea is free of charge even 😉

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:46 am | Permalink

    guys, you are very cool and make a great product. But, it seems to me that it’s very easy to improve your WYSIWYG editor while creating tasks. I need simple line skew.

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:46 am | Permalink

    guys, you are very cool and make a great product. But, it seems to me that it’s very easy to improve your WYSIWYG editor while creating tasks. I need simple line skew.

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:46 am | Permalink

    guys, you are very cool and make a great product. But, it seems to me that it’s very easy to improve your WYSIWYG editor while creating tasks. I need simple line skew.

  • Nathan Broadbent
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 9:53 am | Permalink

    Wow, this is really amazing! nJust last week, our IT administrator skimmed over your April fools joke, and wanted to move all our private git repos onto BitBucket… But now it’s a reality!

  • Nathan Broadbent
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 9:53 am | Permalink

    Wow, this is really amazing!
    Just last week, our IT administrator skimmed over your April fools joke, and wanted to move all our private git repos onto BitBucket… But now it’s a reality!

  • Nathan Broadbent
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 9:53 am | Permalink

    Wow, this is really amazing!
    Just last week, our IT administrator skimmed over your April fools joke, and wanted to move all our private git repos onto BitBucket… But now it’s a reality!

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 1:30 pm | Permalink

    Congratulations! I liked it!

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 1:30 pm | Permalink

    Congratulations! I liked it!

  • Posted October 4, 2011 at 1:30 pm | Permalink

    Congratulations! I liked it!

  • Jon Langevin
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:24 pm | Permalink

    Wow, pretty impressive. I like how the admin interface finally doesn’t kick you out of the repo.

  • Jon Langevin
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:24 pm | Permalink

    Wow, pretty impressive. I like how the admin interface finally doesn’t kick you out of the repo.

  • Jon Langevin
    Posted October 4, 2011 at 8:24 pm | Permalink

    Wow, pretty impressive. I like how the admin interface finally doesn’t kick you out of the repo.

  • Anonymous
    Posted October 8, 2011 at 4:37 am | Permalink

    I think very nice and unique post.nnnnE-conomic integration

  • A.B.
    Posted November 14, 2011 at 7:00 am | Permalink

    You just got another git user to sign up here. I totally subscribe with the ethos of not setting artificial limits on the number of repositories one can have. Bits are just bits, after all.

    Will be sure to mention you to the rest of the devs at work. 🙂

  • A.B.
    Posted November 14, 2011 at 7:00 am | Permalink

    You just got another git user to sign up here. I totally subscribe with the ethos of not setting artificial limits on the number of repositories one can have. Bits are just bits, after all.

    Will be sure to mention you to the rest of the devs at work. 🙂

  • ash
    Posted May 21, 2012 at 12:15 am | Permalink

    great informations

  • Anonymous
    Posted October 3, 2012 at 1:38 am | Permalink

    For how long before it goes to google or Java i.e. Oracle

  • QDot
    Posted July 7, 2013 at 6:28 pm | Permalink

    Where’d the Bit Quest game go? I was enjoying it. Congrats on the successful move!