Mercurial fellowship donation

By on September 21, 2011

We see DVCS as a transformative shift in the way software is developed. Needless to say, Bitbucket has a lot invested in DVCS.

This is why we are excited to announce that Atlassian has donated $24,000 USD to sponsor Mercurial development for 2012. Our contribution goes to the Mercurial Fellowship Project, which is managed by the Software Freedom Conservancy.

Contributions allow Matt Mackall, the primary Mercurial author and project leader, to work full-time on new feature development with assistance from the communitiy, coordinate and support other contributors, improve documentation, fix bugs, and organize coding sprints.

If you are interested in helping sponsor Mercurial development, check out the Mercurial Fellowship wiki page to learn more about how you or your organization can help.

  • Tempus

    Is there somewhere we can see the list of work that’s planned for Mercurial? I’d be very interested in seeing what features are queued up for implementing.

    • http://twitter.com/brodie Brodie Rao

      (I’m a developer on the Bitbucket team who contributes to Mercurial.)

      The Mercurial 1.9 sprint agenda is probably the best starting point for that information: http://mercurial.selenic.com/wiki/1.9sprint#Agenda

      Some of the agenda items have already been implemented: improved changeset discovery, which speeds up pushing and pulling; generaldelta/parentdelta, which can reduce repo size and speed up some operations (though it’s not enabled by default yet); PyPy support; and the refactored patch implementation that allows in-memory patching.

      As far as features still in the works, I think the biggest one at the moment is liquid Hg, which is a system for describing changes to history. It lets you perform history rewriting while preserving deprecated commits and at the same time describing what commits were changed or removed.

  • Tempus

    Is there somewhere we can see the list of work that’s planned for Mercurial? I’d be very interested in seeing what features are queued up for implementing.

  • Tempus

    Is there somewhere we can see the list of work that’s planned for Mercurial? I’d be very interested in seeing what features are queued up for implementing.

  • Laurens Holst

    That’s great, thanks Atlassian.

  • Laurens Holst

    Thatu2019s great, thanks Atlassian.

  • Laurens Holst

    That’s great, thanks Atlassian.

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  • Liran

    Great, thanks !

  • Liran

    Great, thanks !

  • Liran

    Great, thanks !

  • None

    Why aren’t you shown as a gold sponsor > $20k then?

    http://mercurial.selenic.com/sponsors/

  • http://twitter.com/brodie Brodie Rao

    (I’m a developer on the Bitbucket team who contributes to Mercurial.)nnThe Mercurial 1.9 sprint agenda is probably the best starting point for that information:u00a0http://mercurial.selenic.com/wiki/1.9sprint#AgendannSome of the agenda items have already been implemented: improved changeset discovery, which speeds up pushing and pulling; generaldelta/parentdelta, which can reduce repo size and speed up some operations (though it’s not enabled by default yet); PyPy support; and the refactored patch implementation that allows in-memory patching.nnAs far as features still in the works, I think the biggest one at the moment is liquid Hg, which is a system for describing changes to history. It lets you perform history rewriting while preserving deprecated commits and at the same time describing what commits were changed or removed.

  • http://twitter.com/brodie Brodie Rao

    (I’m a developer on the Bitbucket team who contributes to Mercurial.)

    The Mercurial 1.9 sprint agenda is probably the best starting point for that information: http://mercurial.selenic.com/wiki/1.9sprint#Agenda

    Some of the agenda items have already been implemented: improved changeset discovery, which speeds up pushing and pulling; generaldelta/parentdelta, which can reduce repo size and speed up some operations (though it’s not enabled by default yet); PyPy support; and the refactored patch implementation that allows in-memory patching.

    As far as features still in the works, I think the biggest one at the moment is liquid Hg, which is a system for describing changes to history. It lets you perform history rewriting while preserving deprecated commits and at the same time describing what commits were changed or removed.